Jordyn Arndt rss Rabat, Spring 2010

Jordyn Arndt is a junior at St. Catherine University in Minnesota participating in the IES Rabat, Morocco program. She is majoring in International Business & Economics with a double major in French and a minor in Women’s Studies. Jordyn has previously studied abroad in India, Senegal, and Egypt. While in Morocco, Jordyn hopes to become fully engaged in Moroccan society and culture. She is eager to experience another culture, learn about economic development from a North African perspective, begin her studies of Arabic, and continue improving her French. After graduating from St. Catherine University, she plans to obtain a master’s in International Development and help foster sustainable economic development in Africa.

Jordyn's Posts

  • Rabat: A Year Later Blog!

    After spending the month in January conducting research and traveling in India, I am anxious to board the next plane and embark on my next international experience.

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  • Reflections on Semester in Morocco

    I will continue processing the experience throughout the upcoming months. Readjustment back to the United States will be challenging. I will miss Morocco.

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  • Daily Life in Rabat

    While weekend adventures and cultural observations have dominated previous posts, this post will be dedicated to the commonplace routine of an IES Rabat student. As the end of the semester approaches, I am becoming nostalgic for the lifestyle I have enjoyed during the past four months. It will soon be merely a memory.

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  • Living and Learning in Rabat

    One of the highlights of my semesters abroad in Morocco has been my host family experience. Living with a host family allows students to truly experience the culture of their host country. Whether enjoying freshly prepared meals, conversing in the local language, or attending family gatherings, one is constantly learning in the foreign environment.

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  • Weekend in Tangiers

    This weekend, I traveled to Tangiers with five other students. Tangiers used to be a city of international significance where artists and intellectuals of various cultural backgrounds mingled. We spent our weekend exploring the city and visiting the nearby light house and caves.

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  • Spring Break around the World

    The students in the IES Rabat Spring 2010 program are adventurous. During spring break, students traveled to Senegal, Egypt, Italy, Portugal, and Ireland.

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  • Tea and Coffee Culture in Morocco

    Moroccan mint tea, atay in Darjia, is a cultural icon. More than a hot beverage, atay can be symbolic. My host family explained the symbolism of atay by citing a proverb that describes the first cup of tea as bitter as life, the second cup as strong as love, and the third cup as gentle as death.

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  • Hiking in Azrou

    Azrou is about four hours away from Rabat and is located in a mountainous region. Azrou is well-known for its beautiful landscape. We were enticed by the idea of hiking, spending the nights in tents, and seeing the famous Barbary apes that live in the forest!

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  • Weekend in Marrakech

    A couple of weeks ago we went to Marrakech for the weekend…Snake charmers, fresh orange juice vendors, henna artists, storytellers, and dancers enchant and amaze as one explores the Djemma el-Fna at dusk. I was mesmerized by Marrakech’s main square.

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  • Morocco Past and Present: Caravans, Camels, and Crafts

    We recently returned from our weekend trip to the Sahara organized through IES Abroad. The weekend was well spent. Whether we were discussing the transSaharan caravans in Sijilmassa, riding camels and experiencing Berber culture in the desert, or witnessing how income generating crafts and basic education can empower communities in Erfoud, we were constantly learning.

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  • NGO Visits in Morocco

    As I have been settling into the routine of classes and life in Rabat, I have begun to truly appreciate the Fez orientation period. During orientation we visited Ahli, a women’s association for street children and Access, a program sponsored by the American Embassy that enables children from low income families to learn English for free.

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  • Hospitality and Cuisine: Transcending Language Barriers

    Students have been enjoying experiencing the hospitality of Moroccan families. The Bakkali family treats us as if we are one of their own. The majority of our interactions have been around the dining table in front of the television.

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  • Latin American Soap Operas in Africa

    Fez will be our new home for the next two weeks. We are attending Darija (Moroccan Arabic) classes and lectures addressing history, language, religion, and gender in Morocco. While formal instruction has provided us with an introduction to Darija and Morocco, our host families have played the greatest role in enriching our language skills and cultural understandings.

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  • Rick’s Café and Shanty Towns

    I arrived in Morocco the morning of February 1st. Since the program officially started on February 2nd, I spent a day and a half in Casablanca sightseeing with another student in the IES Rabat program. We had plans to visit Hassan II mosque and Rick’s Café, two well-known landmarks in Casablanca, during our short visit.

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  • Preparing for Rabat

    Assalamalekum! Bonjour! Welcome to the first post on my blog about IES Abroad Rabat, Morocco.

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