Jennifer Edwards rss Milan, Fall 2011

Jennifer Edwards has wanted to study music in Italy since the age of six, so this trip is a dream come true for her. She is a junior at Brandeis University, where she majors in Music Composition and Psychology, and minors in Italian Studies. At Brandeis this past year, she was an officer in a discussion group on sexualities and gender, was inducted into the National Society for Collegiate Scholars, and contributed to the satire magazine Gravity. This is Jennifer's first time traveling off of the North American continent and she is excited and nervous, but most of all feels this experience has been a lifetime in coming and is thrilled to actually be going after all these years.

Jennifer's Posts

  • Diventarsi Tranquillo

    The beginning of this semester has been way different from my first semester here. Since I didn’t go home for the holidays, I traveled around for about three and a half weeks (my retrospective advice being: space it out). So when I got back to Milan, a place that I was familiar with, it almost felt like home. Almost.

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  • If I ever get arrested, it will be for decking one of these people…

    I swore I wouldn’t write a rant on European men, particularly because I was so well warned before coming here, but I’ve felt the urge starting to overwhelm me.

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  • Looking Back and Ahead

    This weekend I became an official resident of the Collegio di Milano, which meant hauling my stuff around town (I swear it multiplies when you’re not looking) and signing a bunch of paperwork, but now that I’m here, I’m really psyched about it.

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  • Music and Cookies and Acceptance

    It’s that time of year again. No, not Christmastime. Housing selection time, and it’s making me reflect a lot on my current housing.

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  • Milano Incasinato

    I don’t expect violence or anything particularly dangerous, but as a foreigner, I think it’s only prudent to keep a low profile if I end up somewhere where people are protesting. And I truly think it’ll be really exciting being here in Italy to see how this all resolves.

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  • You might be in Italy if…

    So I know this is cliche, but I thought it might be fun to compile my own little list of things I’ve only really experience in Italy.

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  • Homesick in Tuscany

    Every time I travel this semester, I compare the city I go to with Milan, and every time, I feel like by some chance, I fell into the right city.

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  • A Frozen City

    This Friday, as everyone was flooding into Corso Porta Ticinese in Milan for their evening apperitivi, I was just getting off the train in Venice. And as they gathered around the only remaining reminder that Milan was once a canal city too, sipping negroni with friends, I was boarding a vaporetto for Piazza San Marco.

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  • A word on language

    When people meet me and compliment me for being able to string a sentence together, I find myself saying, “Me la cavo,” which means, “I get by.”

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  • Le piccole cose

    I’m settling into the rhythm of life here, yes, but my hold is still tenuous. Small victories can make me feel like I’m on top of the world, like I’ve finally figured out the answer to life, the universe, and everything.

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  • That Course Post

    So, all-in-all, course registration: not the highlight of my trip so far, but it is giving me useful insight into the way Italian bureaucracy works, and when everything is settled, I expect to be happy with the courses I have picked.

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  • “Con meno casino!”

    The first time I heard this phrase, it sounded like part of a sandwich order, like, “Light on the mayonnaise!” But actually, it is an idiomatic expression that means something along the lines of, “with less chaos.”

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  • Feeling “Ancora un po’ perduta”

    I don’t know why, and this never happens to me in America, but I give them some ridiculous answer in grammar that I know is incorrect and can easily correct as soon as I feel like the spotlight is off me.

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  • Discovering New Antiquity

    There is an atmosphere in Milan that is like no other place that I have ever been; it is both ancient and young at the same time. Unlike in America, where we put up glass and railings and rope around our historical landmarks, in Milan, they are just there, mixed in with the scenery.

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  • Three days left in the USA

    My bedroom feels strangely empty from all of the clothes I’ve either packed or donated, and I’m finding that this process is really making me think about what actually matters to me.

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