Jason Klanderman rss Beijing, Spring 2013

Jason Klanderman, originally from Chicago, grew up in Amsterdam. He has travelled extensively through Europe and Asia. He is an International Politics, History and Global and International Studies triple major, with a minor in Chinese at Penn State University. When not in State College, where he is currently living, you can find him traveling between Amsterdam, Singapore, and various other places, visiting family and friends. His hobbies include reading, writing, cooking and going to the gym. Read about his experiences as he tackles the middle kingdom, China, during his spring semester 2013.

Jason's Posts

  • China, a Trip Down Memory Lane

    Coming back to the US, life was different from the way I remembered it.

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  • 16 Days in Tibet

    Before I departed, I knew next to nothing about Tibet, its people, its language or its culture. It was a mythical place, which only seemed to exist in movies and on TV, but not a place where I would go. Now having finally visited the roof of the world (one of Tibet’s many nicknames), I can say it is no longer a complete mystery to me, yet many of its mythical qualities remain.

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  • 16 Days in Tibet

    I’ve heard from students that have travelled before that Tibet is one of the least accessible countries in the world. That makes this trip all the more exciting since I am getting the chance to see this area first hand, and under the guidance of expert local guides.

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  • Guangzhou, the Singapore of China?

    The most interesting thing about Guangzhou however was that there were hardly any foreigners. When I walked around Beijing road, the main tourist shopping street in Guangzhou, there was not another foreigner in sight, perhaps there were a lot of Chinese tourists, but I did not see a single American or European walking around.

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  • TEDA, China’s Utopia?

    TEDA can be seen as an industrial park of sorts, being an area for industrial production, research and development, and as of late, for the service related industry.

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  • A Day in the Life of a Terra Cotta Warrior

    Last weekend I went to Xi’an for the day. I took an overnight sleeper train from Beijing, and got to Xi’an in a bit less than 12 hours. The ride was very smooth; trains probably the best way to travel in China, especially if you have the time.

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  • Hiking in Chengdu

    This whole mountain range (all 36 peaks) was one of the most important centers of Daoism and hosts many temples. The temples were beautiful, well maintained, and it wasn’t really crowded. The options were to take a cable car up to one of the highest peaks, from which one could hike up to other peaks, or just hike all the way up the mountain.

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  • Chengdu!

    To relax after studying for our exams, a group of us are going to Chengdu, in Sichuan province for a long weekend. These long weekends are great opportunities to travel and explore the country.

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  • For the Stories

    The other day, a Chinese student approached a friend of mine, he was looking for two native English speakers, to help judge an English speaking competition in ZhangJiaKou (a city in nearby Hebei province).

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  • Harbin 2013

    This was one of the coolest places I’ve ever been, and also one of the nicest things I’ve ever seen. It was just so grand in scale, and well done that it was simply mesmerizing.

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  • 21 Hours in Harbin

    One of the returning students to IES went to Harbin last year during this time, they said it will be one of the coolest places you’ll ever see, but you’ll also be the coldest you’ve ever been.

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  • Chunjie 2.0

    A week ago, I had six friends over to my Chinese host family to celebrate the Chinese new year. This was in a word, fantastic!

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  • Chun Jie

    I will be spending the New Year with my homestay family, giving me the opportunity to experience the coming of the New Year from a truly Chinese perspective. Where better to experience the largest Chinese holiday of the year, than in the nation’s capital?

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  • The Donkey Burger

    Whilst many foods might seem foreign, the key to having an amazing time in China is trying new things. It might seem very foreign, and even unappealing, but in China, the local people eat almost anything, and you’ll find that the things you least expect to like (such as donkey) can be really good!

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  • Nabianr

    Today was the first day that we actually got to explore Haidian, the neighborhood in which IES resides, a bit more thoroughly. Mind you, when I say neighborhood, this is a neighborhood with over two million people. Thus exploring this was no small feat.

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  • Here. We. Go.

    I am looking forward to return to the Forbidden City and the Great Wall, but this time seeing them covered with snow, and to enjoy local foods such as Jiaozi (dumplings), Huo Guo (Hot Pot) and much more.

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